10 Big Eyed Pet Fish To Add To Your Aquarium 

Fish come in all shapes and sizes, but some stand out with their mesmerizing feature – big eyes. 

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll dive deep into the underwater world to explore the remarkable diversity of big eyed pet fish, shedding light on their unique adaptations, behaviors, and more.

Bubble-Eye Goldfish

Bubble-Eye Goldfish

Origin: China

The Bubble-Eye Goldfish, Carassius auratus, is a unique and captivating member of the goldfish family known for its distinctive appearance, notably its characteristic “bubble” or fluid-filled sacs beneath its eyes. 

Instead of the typical round eyes, this fish has large, fluid-filled sacs beneath each eye. These sacs resemble delicate, translucent bubbles, giving the fish an enchanting, almost whimsical appearance. The bubbles sway gracefully as the fish swims, adding an element of elegance to any aquarium.

Habitat and Care

Bubble-Eye Goldfish thrive in freshwater aquariums. These fish prefer temperatures between 65°F to 78°F (18°C to 26°C). They are best kept in a spacious tank with a gentle filter to ensure good water quality. They need soft substrate to prevent injury to their delicate bubbles.

Feeding Bubble-Eye Goldfish: they are omnivorous and need a diet of high-quality goldfish flakes, pellets, and live or frozen food like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia.

Because of their distinctive bubbles, be cautious when selecting tankmates. Bubble-Eye Goldfish are slower swimmers, making them vulnerable to more agile or aggressive tankmates. Peaceful companions like other fancy goldfish varieties or non-nipping community fish are a better choice.

Ranchu Goldfish 

Ranchu Goldfish 

Origin: Japan

The Ranchu Goldfish is instantly recognizable by its unique body shape. Unlike many other goldfish varieties, the Ranchu has a prominent, rounded body with no dorsal fin. 

Its back gracefully arches, and its tail, also known as the caudal fin, is fan-shaped and spreads like delicate petals. 

These features, along with its brilliant metallic scales, give the Ranchu a dignified and luxurious appearance that sets it apart from other goldfish.

Ranchu’s eyes are bright and alert, contributing to its charming expression. These eyes are beautifully framed by the fish’s compact and rounded face, enhancing its overall appeal.

Habitat and Care

To provide the best care for Ranchu Goldfish, a well-maintained freshwater aquarium with temperatures ranging from 65°F to 78°F (18°C to 26°C) is ideal. The absence of a dorsal fin means Ranchus are not the strongest swimmers, so a tank with minimal water movement is preferred.

The Ranchu is an omnivorous fish, and its diet should include high-quality goldfish flakes or pellets, supplemented with live or frozen foods like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia. Regular feedings in small portions should prevent overeating and digestive issues.

Due to its delicate nature, the Ranchu should be housed with peaceful tankmates, such as other fancy goldfish varieties or non-aggressive community fish. Their slower swimming speed makes them vulnerable to more agile companions.

Moor Goldfish 

Moor Goldfish 

Origin: China

The Moor Goldfish, also known as the Black Moor, Carassius auratus, is a distinctive and striking variety within the goldfish family. 

Moor Goldfish are instantly recognizable by their velvety black or dark metallic scales. Their sleek bodies, which can grow up to 6-8 inches in length, are accentuated by a double-tail fin and delicate, flowing fins. 

However, it’s the Moor Goldfish’s bulbous eyes that truly set them apart. These eyes are large, round and protrude from the sides of their heads, creating a charming, almost comical look.

Habitat and Care

They thrive at temperatures between 65°F to 78°F (18°C to 26°C). Due to their long, flowing fins, it’s advisable to maintain gentle water movement to prevent fin damage.

The Moor Goldfish’s diet should consist of high-quality goldfish flakes or pellets, along with live or frozen foods like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia. Be cautious with their feeding, as they are prone to obesity, which can lead to health issues.

These goldfish are generally peaceful and can be housed with other fancy goldfish varieties, but avoid placing them with nippy or aggressive tankmates to ensure their well-being. Their protruding eyes can be susceptible to injury, so a smooth substrate and careful handling are important.

Celestial Goldfish 

Celestial Goldfish 

Origin: China

The most distinguishing feature of the Celestial Goldfish is its upturned, telescope-like eyes. These eyes gaze skyward, giving the fish an ethereal and celestial appearance. 

Their eyes are encased in fluid-filled sacs, making them appear large and round, and giving the fish an almost perpetually surprised expression. The rest of their body is compact, with a double tail fin, and their scales may vary in color, ranging from red, orange, or white to a combination of these shades.

Habitat and Care

To ensure the well-being of Celestial Goldfish, a freshwater aquarium is ideal, with temperatures ranging between 65°F to 78°F (18°C to 26°C). Given their unique eye shape, it’s best to provide a tank with minimal water movement to prevent potential eye injuries.

In terms of diet, Celestial Goldfish are omnivorous and will accept high-quality goldfish flakes or pellets. Supplement their diet with live or frozen foods like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia to provide a balanced and nutritious meal.

These goldfish are generally peaceful, but due to their slower swimming speed and distinctive eye shape, it’s advisable to house them with compatible tankmates, such as other fancy goldfish varieties or non-aggressive community fish.

Telescope goldfish

Telescope goldfish

Origin: China

Their large, bulbous eyes are a defining feature, and they give the fish an almost comical, yet endearing, appearance. The eyes can come in various colors, including black, red, or even silver, adding to their visual appeal.

Habitat and Care

Telescope Goldfish, like other goldfish varieties, thrive in freshwater aquariums with temperatures ranging from 65°F to 78°F (18°C to 26°C). Given their distinctive eye shape, it’s important to provide a tank with minimal water movement to protect these sensitive eyes from potential injury.

Feeding Telescope Goldfish is straightforward; they are omnivorous and will readily accept high-quality goldfish flakes or pellets. It’s advisable to include a variety of live or frozen foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia in their diet for optimal nutrition.

The peaceful nature of Telescope Goldfish makes them suitable for cohabitation with other fancy goldfish varieties and non-aggressive community fish. However, due to their slower swimming speed and protruding eyes, it’s crucial to choose tankmates carefully to avoid potential stress or injuries.

Parrot Cichlid

Parrot Cichlid

Origin: Central America

The Parrot Cichlid, or Parrot Fish, is a unique and visually striking species in the world of ornamental fish, known for its distinctive body shape and vibrant colors. Native to various parts of Central America, these captivating fish have become a sought-after choice for aquarists worldwide.

The most prominent feature of the Parrot Cichlid is its remarkably unusual body shape. It has a rounded, almost “parrot-like” head, which gives the fish its name. Their bodies can display a range of colors, including red, orange, yellow, and even blue or green, making them a visually appealing addition to any aquarium.

Habitat and Care

Parrot Cichlids thrive in freshwater aquariums with stable water parameters. They prefer temperatures in the range of 75°F to 80°F (24°C to 27°C). These fish are relatively hardy and adaptable, but maintaining good water quality is essential to their well-being.

Parrot Cichlids are omnivorous, and their diet should include high-quality cichlid pellets, live or frozen foods like bloodworms, brine shrimp, and occasional plant matter. They are known to be messy eaters, so efficient filtration is crucial to maintain water quality.

When it comes to tankmates, Parrot Cichlids can be housed with other non-aggressive fish that are similar in size. However, it’s best to avoid aggressive or overly territorial species, as Parrot Cichlids may be more vulnerable due to their unique body shape.

Flowerhorn Cichlid

Flowerhorn Cichlid

Origin: unclear

One of the most remarkable features of the Flowerhorn Cichlid is its pronounced nuchal hump, a fleshy growth on its head that varies in size and shape among individuals. This head protuberance is often said to resemble a “flower,” which contributes to the name of the species. 

Flowerhorn Cichlids exhibit vibrant colors, including shades of red, orange, yellow, and blue, which are further intensified with age and proper care.

Habitat and Care

Flowerhorn Cichlids require a spacious freshwater aquarium with stable water conditions.

They thrive in temperatures ranging from 78°F to 82°F (26°C to 28°C). A robust filtration system is necessary to maintain water quality due to their messy feeding habits.

Flowerhorn Cichlids are omnivorous and have hearty appetites. Their diet should consist of high-quality cichlid pellets, supplemented with live or frozen foods like bloodworms, brine shrimp, and even occasional vegetables. Proper nutrition plays a crucial role in their health and color development.

These cichlids are known for their territorial behavior and aggressive tendencies, particularly when breeding. It is recommended to house Flowerhorn Cichlids alone or with larger, non-aggressive tankmates to prevent conflicts.

Betta Fish

Betta Fish

Origin: Southeast Asia

Betta fish, scientifically known as Betta splendens, are one of the most popular and visually stunning species in the world of pet fish. Hailing from the rice paddies, canals, and slow-moving waters of Southeast Asia, these colorful fish have become beloved by aquarium enthusiasts for their vibrant hues and distinctive personalities.

Betta fish are celebrated for their remarkable fins and brilliant coloration. Male Bettas, in particular, exhibit long, flowing fins, which come in a wide spectrum of colors, ranging from rich blues, fiery reds, and shimmering greens. Some Betta variants, such as the Halfmoon or Crown Tail Betta, have fins that are even more elaborate, resembling delicate works of art.

Habitat and Care

Bettas are tropical fish, requiring water temperatures between 78°F to 80°F (25°C to 27°C). A gentle filter and a heater are often necessary to maintain stable conditions.

They are carnivorous and enjoy a diet primarily consisting of high-quality Betta pellets or flakes. They can also appreciate live or frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms. 

Bettas are susceptible to obesity, which can lead to health issues.

Known for their territorial nature, Bettas are best housed individually to prevent aggression. They can, however, coexist with certain peaceful tankmates like small, non-aggressive fish or shrimp, provided there is enough space and hiding spots in the aquarium.

You might be interested in our guide for older betta fish if your betta is showing signs of aging. 

Big-Eyed Scopas Tang

Big-Eyed Scopas Tang

Origin: Indo-pacific

The Big-Eyed Scopas Tang, scientifically known as Zebrasoma scopas, is a captivating marine fish that belongs to the Surgeonfish family. Originating from the warm waters of the Indo-Pacific region, the Big-Eyed Scopas Tang is renowned for its striking appearance, particularly its large, expressive eyes.

The body of the Scopas Tang is typically brown or grey with a slightly darker dorsal fin, while the tail fin features a yellowish hue.

Habitat and Care

Big-Eyed Scopas Tangs are primarily found in coral reef environments, and they require specific care to thrive in captivity. They need a well-maintained marine aquarium with ample space for swimming and algae. Maintaining stable water conditions, including temperature, salinity, and water quality, is crucial to their health.

As herbivores, their diet should consist of a variety of marine algae and seaweed. Providing a balanced and diverse diet, including high-quality marine flake or pellet food and fresh or frozen marine vegetation, is essential to meet their nutritional needs.

While they are generally peaceful, the Scopas Tang can become territorial, especially if multiple individuals are housed together. They need hiding places and adequate swimming space to minimize potential conflicts. A suitable tankmate can help reduce stress and aggression.

Pufferfish

Pufferfish

Origin: Worldwide

These charismatic aquatic creatures are found in both freshwater and marine environments across the globe, and they have become popular additions to many aquariums due to their captivating personalities.

Pufferfish are easily recognizable by their unique body shape. They have elongated, chubby bodies that can puff up when they feel threatened, a defense mechanism to deter potential predators. 

Pufferfish come in various species, each with its own coloration and markings.

Habitat and Care

The specific care requirements for pufferfish can vary depending on the species, but there are some general guidelines to follow. 

Pufferfish, whether freshwater or marine, need an appropriately sized aquarium with good water quality. Water parameters, including temperature and salinity, should match the needs of the particular species.

Pufferfish are carnivorous and have strong beaks to crush their prey. A protein-rich diet can include high-quality pellets, live or frozen shrimp, snails, and occasionally small crustaceans.

While some pufferfish can be kept in community aquariums, be cautious about tankmates. 

Pufferfish can be territorial and, in some cases, aggressive. They can also be prone to nipping at the fins of other fish.